Quiz 14 of 14

2014 GOVERNMENT WAEC Theory Past Questions

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(i) The study of government helps us to know what is going on in our country and around the world.

(ii) It helps us to know the successes and failures of our past leaders.

(iii) It enables us to differentiate between good and bad government.

(iv) It prepares us to take part in the governance of our country.

(v) It enables us to know our rights, duties and obligations as citizens.

(vi) It puts the citizens in a position to defend their rights when violated.

(vii) It helps to inculcate the spirit of nationalism and patriotism in the citizens.

(viii) It enables people to understand the systems of government adopted in a country.

(ix) It helps us to find solutions to our political problems/challenges.

(x) It provides career opportunities for those who studied it.

(xi) it widens the citizens the citizen's political horizon.

(xii) It improves the relationship between the ruler and the ruled.

(a) Capitalism can be defined as a political and economic system in which the means of production, distribution and exchange of goods and services are in the hands of individuals.

(b) Advantages:

(i) Capitalism guarantees maximum freedom of enterprises.

(ii) It brings about an increase in the quality of goods and services produced.

(iii) It creates room for effective use of talents.

(iv) It encourages numerous inventions and innovations.

(v) it encourages diverse economic development.

(vi) It leads to specialization.

(vii) It promotes hard work.

(viii) It encourages healthy competition.

(ix) it encourages private ownership of property.

(x) It encourages consumer sovereignty.

Disadvantages: 

(i) It encourages the exploitation of the poor by the rich.

(ii) It leads to inequitable distribution of income and wealth.

(iii) It may lead to unhealthy rivalry.

(iv) It may threaten the sovereignty of the state.

(v) It may lead to conflict between employers and employers and employees.

(vi) It may lead to job insecurity.

(vii) It does not consider public interest because of the profit motive.

(a) Legitimacy is the acceptance and recognition by the people of the right of the ruler to govern.

(b) Factors that determine legitimacy:

(i) Popular Support A government is legitimate if it receives the popular support of the citizens.

(ii) Popular Support Participation - For a government to be accorded legitimacy, the citizens must be allowed to participate in political activities.

(iii) Good Governance - Any government that operates on the tenets of good governance may earn legitimacy.

(iv) Good Leadership - Legitimacy will be accorded to a leader with sterling qualities.

(v) Ideology - The ability of the government to uphold the state ideology will help attain legitimacy.

(vi) Periodic free and fair elections.

(vii) Respect for Fundamental Human Rights/Rule of Law.

(viii) Appreciative level of socio-economic development in the state by the Government.

(ix) International Recognition.

(x) Respect for the customs and traditions of the people.

(xi) Adherence to the provisions of the constitution of the state

(i) Geographical nearness/contiguity.

(ii) The desire for a union.

(iii) Availability of resources.

(iv) The size of the country/population.

(v) Absence of marked inequalities.

(vi) Common historical/colonial experience.

(vii) Fear of a-a 2 domination.

(viii) Preservation of local autonomy.

(ix) Ethnic diversity.

(x) Need for the common defense system.

(i) Existence of an impartial and independent electoral commission.

(ii) Periodic and regular elections.

(iii) Proper delineation of the country into constituencies/districts.

(iv) Compilation and availability of comprehensive votes register.

(v) Regular and periodic public display of voters' list.

(vi) Polling offices and officers, ballot boxes and papers, and other necessary election personnel and materials should be adequately provided.

(vii) Voting atmosphere devoid of fear of molestation intimidation and victimization.

(viii) The requirement for qualification for election must be clearly stipulated and adequately publicized.

(ix) Counting of ballot papers/votes should be publicly done and the results declared immediately.

(x) All election materials should be tightly secured.

(xi) The electorate should be given adequate political education.

(xii) Equal access to the media by candidates and political education.

(xiii) Existence of an Independent Judiciary

(xiv) Opportunity, to challenge election results.

(xv) Existence of a multi-party system.

 

(i) To publicly announce the demise/death of any Oba/King who passed.

(ii) To perform rituals during and after the burial of the late Oba/King.

(iii) To request the ruling family to nominate some aspirants to be considered/screened for the vacant stool/post of the Oba/King.

(iv) To screen all nominees/aspirants (in conjunction with the ifa/oracle priest)for their vacant stool/post of the Oba/King.

(v) To announce the successful nominee as the sole candidate for the vacant stool/post of the Oba/King.

(vi) To install the sole candidate as the new Oba/King.

(vii) To carry out certain rituals before, and after the installation/crowning of the new Oba/King.

(viii) To decorate the new Oba/King by placing the crown and also the purified leaves on his head and hand over of him the staff of office.

(ix) To check against possible excesses, despotism, tyranny, or abuse/misuse of power office by the Oba/King.

(x) The Council of King Makers had the power to investigate the Oba/King on any allegation brought to the Council by the people/subjects.

(xi) It had the power to proclaim or declare the total rejection of the Oba/King by the people and the gods of Yoruba land if the Oba/King was found guilty.

(xii) It had the power to advise the Oba/King to either commit suicide or go into exile (abdicate throne).

(xiii) It had the power to force/compel the Oba/King to sight the forbidden contents of the occult calabash.

(xiv) It had the power to decline/refuse to decorate any female regent who did not appear before it in a complete/full Yoruba male dress.

(xv) In the event of the absence or incapacitation of the Oba/King the Chairman of the Council, Bashoron acted as a regent OBa/King.

(xvi) To preserve the sacredness of the institution of Oba-ship and ensure that it is not desecrated.

(i) The centralized federal system of administration in French West Africa created regional consciousness instead of a national one.

(ii) The rights and privileges enjoyed by the assimilated Africans did not motivate them to struggle for self-rule.

(iii) The use of oppressive measures such as indignant and forced labour.

(iv) The policy of Assimilation limited Africans' access to education.

(v) Suppression of political freedom in French West Africa

(vi) The political parties formed after the Second World War were off-shoots of the parties in France and therefore could not mobilize the people for self-rule.

(vii) Late establishment of newspapers.

(viii) The regard of French West African colonies by France as her overseas provinces.

(ix) The incorporation of the French West African economy into that of France.

(a) Features of the Macpherson Constitution:

(i) The establishment of a central legislature known as the House of Representatives.

(ii) The establishment of Central Executive Council.

(iii) Provision for the establishment of regional legislatures

(iv) Establishment of a unicameral legislature in the Eastern Region.

(v) It provided for the establishment of a Regional Executive Council in each region.

(vi) The extension of the franchise from Lagos and Calabar to other parts of Nigeria.

(vii) Establishment of bicameral legislatures in the Northern and Western Regions.

 

(b) Reasons for the breakdown of the Lyttleton Constitution:

(i) The Constitution failed to provide for the official post of a Prime Minister at the federal level.

(ii) The Federal Ministers were more loyal and committed to their regions than to the federation.

(iii) The retention of the official (non-elected) members who were regarded as mere colonial government stooges in the Federal Executive Council.

(iv) It failed to provide a uniform electoral system for the country.

(v) The Constitution failed to address/tackle the minority issues which led to the setting up the oldie Willinks Commission in 1957.

(vi) Formation of political parties based on regional boundaries.

(vii) The hostile inter-regional/ethnic friction, mutual mistrust, and hostility made the Constitution practically unworkable.

(viii) The inability of any single political party to have the required majority with which to control the federal parliament

(x) It failed to grant political independence to Nigeria contrary to the expectations of the nationalists and the political party which moved the motion for independence in 1953.

(xi)The Constitution was weakened and made almost irrelevant by the resolutions of the 1057/1958 Constitutional Conferences.

(xii) The attainment of political independence by Nigeria in 1960.

(i) In democratic governments, political leaders are elected while in military regimes members of the administration are not elected.

(ii) In democratic governments, Fundamental Human Rights are guaranteed and respected while in military regimes, they are curtailed and violated with impunity.

(iii) Actions of democratic governments are open to public scrutiny and criticisms while military regimes are intolerant and apprehensive to scrutiny and criticisms.

(iv) In a democratic government, political parties exist while in military regimes, they are banned.

(v) In democratic governments, laws are generally made through democratic procedures while military regimes ruled by decrees.

(vi) in democratic governments, the constitution, as the fundamental law, is allowed to operate while in military regimes they are suspended.

(vii) Democratic governments promote free press while in military regime; they are usually gagged/censored or proscribed.

(viii) Democratic governments apply and uphold the separation of powers while in military regimes, powers are fused.

(ix) Decisions in democratic governments are through persuasion while in military regimes, coercion and violence are utilized.

(x) Democratic governments are legitimate while military regimes are illegitimate

(xi) Democratic governments gained international recognition while a military regime may not.

(xii) In democratic governments, there is the independence of the judiciary while under a military regime, the independence of the Judiciary is eroded by setting up special military tribunals.

(xiii) In democratic governments, there is a fixed term of office while in the military there is no fixed term of office.

(xiv) Democratic governments are responsive and accountable to the people while a military regime is neither responsive nor accountable to the people.

(i) Economic inequality among member states.

(ii) inability to enforce its resolutions/sanctions

(iii) Divided loyalty resulting from the membership of other international organizations.

(iv) Ideological differences of member states.

(v) The political instability of some member states.

(vi) Introduction of visas by Britain discouraged free movement of people and technology.

(vii) Inadequate funds for the execution of its projects

(viii) Free entry and exit of member states from the organization.

(i) The study of government helps us to know what is going on in our country and around the world.

(ii) It helps us to know the successes and failures of our past leaders.

(iii) It enables us to differentiate between good and bad government.

(iv) It prepares us to take part in the governance of our country.

(v) It enables us to know our rights, duties and obligations as citizens.

(vi) It puts the citizens in a position to defend their rights when violated.

(vii) It helps to inculcate the spirit of nationalism and patriotism in the citizens.

(viii) It enables people to understand the systems of government adopted in a country.

(ix) It helps us to find solutions to our political problems/challenges.

(x) It provides career opportunities for those who studied it.

(xi) it widens the citizens the citizen's political horizon.

(xii) It improves the relationship between the ruler and the ruled.

(a) Capitalism can be defined as a political and economic system in which the means of production, distribution and exchange of goods and services are in the hands of individuals.

(b) Advantages:

(i) Capitalism guarantees maximum freedom of enterprises.

(ii) It brings about an increase in the quality of goods and services produced.

(iii) It creates room for effective use of talents.

(iv) It encourages numerous inventions and innovations.

(v) it encourages diverse economic development.

(vi) It leads to specialization.

(vii) It promotes hard work.

(viii) It encourages healthy competition.

(ix) it encourages private ownership of property.

(x) It encourages consumer sovereignty.

Disadvantages: 

(i) It encourages the exploitation of the poor by the rich.

(ii) It leads to inequitable distribution of income and wealth.

(iii) It may lead to unhealthy rivalry.

(iv) It may threaten the sovereignty of the state.

(v) It may lead to conflict between employers and employers and employees.

(vi) It may lead to job insecurity.

(vii) It does not consider public interest because of the profit motive.

(a) Legitimacy is the acceptance and recognition by the people of the right of the ruler to govern.

(b) Factors that determine legitimacy:

(i) Popular Support A government is legitimate if it receives the popular support of the citizens.

(ii) Popular Support Participation - For a government to be accorded legitimacy, the citizens must be allowed to participate in political activities.

(iii) Good Governance - Any government that operates on the tenets of good governance may earn legitimacy.

(iv) Good Leadership - Legitimacy will be accorded to a leader with sterling qualities.

(v) Ideology - The ability of the government to uphold the state ideology will help attain legitimacy.

(vi) Periodic free and fair elections.

(vii) Respect for Fundamental Human Rights/Rule of Law.

(viii) Appreciative level of socio-economic development in the state by the Government.

(ix) International Recognition.

(x) Respect for the customs and traditions of the people.

(xi) Adherence to the provisions of the constitution of the state

(i) Geographical nearness/contiguity.

(ii) The desire for a union.

(iii) Availability of resources.

(iv) The size of the country/population.

(v) Absence of marked inequalities.

(vi) Common historical/colonial experience.

(vii) Fear of a-a 2 domination.

(viii) Preservation of local autonomy.

(ix) Ethnic diversity.

(x) Need for the common defense system.

(i) Existence of an impartial and independent electoral commission.

(ii) Periodic and regular elections.

(iii) Proper delineation of the country into constituencies/districts.

(iv) Compilation and availability of comprehensive votes register.

(v) Regular and periodic public display of voters' list.

(vi) Polling offices and officers, ballot boxes and papers, and other necessary election personnel and materials should be adequately provided.

(vii) Voting atmosphere devoid of fear of molestation intimidation and victimization.

(viii) The requirement for qualification for election must be clearly stipulated and adequately publicized.

(ix) Counting of ballot papers/votes should be publicly done and the results declared immediately.

(x) All election materials should be tightly secured.

(xi) The electorate should be given adequate political education.

(xii) Equal access to the media by candidates and political education.

(xiii) Existence of an Independent Judiciary

(xiv) Opportunity, to challenge election results.

(xv) Existence of a multi-party system.

 

(i) To publicly announce the demise/death of any Oba/King who passed.

(ii) To perform rituals during and after the burial of the late Oba/King.

(iii) To request the ruling family to nominate some aspirants to be considered/screened for the vacant stool/post of the Oba/King.

(iv) To screen all nominees/aspirants (in conjunction with the ifa/oracle priest)for their vacant stool/post of the Oba/King.

(v) To announce the successful nominee as the sole candidate for the vacant stool/post of the Oba/King.

(vi) To install the sole candidate as the new Oba/King.

(vii) To carry out certain rituals before, and after the installation/crowning of the new Oba/King.

(viii) To decorate the new Oba/King by placing the crown and also the purified leaves on his head and hand over of him the staff of office.

(ix) To check against possible excesses, despotism, tyranny, or abuse/misuse of power office by the Oba/King.

(x) The Council of King Makers had the power to investigate the Oba/King on any allegation brought to the Council by the people/subjects.

(xi) It had the power to proclaim or declare the total rejection of the Oba/King by the people and the gods of Yoruba land if the Oba/King was found guilty.

(xii) It had the power to advise the Oba/King to either commit suicide or go into exile (abdicate throne).

(xiii) It had the power to force/compel the Oba/King to sight the forbidden contents of the occult calabash.

(xiv) It had the power to decline/refuse to decorate any female regent who did not appear before it in a complete/full Yoruba male dress.

(xv) In the event of the absence or incapacitation of the Oba/King the Chairman of the Council, Bashoron acted as a regent OBa/King.

(xvi) To preserve the sacredness of the institution of Oba-ship and ensure that it is not desecrated.

(i) The centralized federal system of administration in French West Africa created regional consciousness instead of a national one.

(ii) The rights and privileges enjoyed by the assimilated Africans did not motivate them to struggle for self-rule.

(iii) The use of oppressive measures such as indignant and forced labour.

(iv) The policy of Assimilation limited Africans' access to education.

(v) Suppression of political freedom in French West Africa

(vi) The political parties formed after the Second World War were off-shoots of the parties in France and therefore could not mobilize the people for self-rule.

(vii) Late establishment of newspapers.

(viii) The regard of French West African colonies by France as her overseas provinces.

(ix) The incorporation of the French West African economy into that of France.

(a) Features of the Macpherson Constitution:

(i) The establishment of a central legislature known as the House of Representatives.

(ii) The establishment of Central Executive Council.

(iii) Provision for the establishment of regional legislatures

(iv) Establishment of a unicameral legislature in the Eastern Region.

(v) It provided for the establishment of a Regional Executive Council in each region.

(vi) The extension of the franchise from Lagos and Calabar to other parts of Nigeria.

(vii) Establishment of bicameral legislatures in the Northern and Western Regions.

 

(b) Reasons for the breakdown of the Lyttleton Constitution:

(i) The Constitution failed to provide for the official post of a Prime Minister at the federal level.

(ii) The Federal Ministers were more loyal and committed to their regions than to the federation.

(iii) The retention of the official (non-elected) members who were regarded as mere colonial government stooges in the Federal Executive Council.

(iv) It failed to provide a uniform electoral system for the country.

(v) The Constitution failed to address/tackle the minority issues which led to the setting up the oldie Willinks Commission in 1957.

(vi) Formation of political parties based on regional boundaries.

(vii) The hostile inter-regional/ethnic friction, mutual mistrust, and hostility made the Constitution practically unworkable.

(viii) The inability of any single political party to have the required majority with which to control the federal parliament

(x) It failed to grant political independence to Nigeria contrary to the expectations of the nationalists and the political party which moved the motion for independence in 1953.

(xi)The Constitution was weakened and made almost irrelevant by the resolutions of the 1057/1958 Constitutional Conferences.

(xii) The attainment of political independence by Nigeria in 1960.

(i) In democratic governments, political leaders are elected while in military regimes members of the administration are not elected.

(ii) In democratic governments, Fundamental Human Rights are guaranteed and respected while in military regimes, they are curtailed and violated with impunity.

(iii) Actions of democratic governments are open to public scrutiny and criticisms while military regimes are intolerant and apprehensive to scrutiny and criticisms.

(iv) In a democratic government, political parties exist while in military regimes, they are banned.

(v) In democratic governments, laws are generally made through democratic procedures while military regimes ruled by decrees.

(vi) in democratic governments, the constitution, as the fundamental law, is allowed to operate while in military regimes they are suspended.

(vii) Democratic governments promote free press while in military regime; they are usually gagged/censored or proscribed.

(viii) Democratic governments apply and uphold the separation of powers while in military regimes, powers are fused.

(ix) Decisions in democratic governments are through persuasion while in military regimes, coercion and violence are utilized.

(x) Democratic governments are legitimate while military regimes are illegitimate

(xi) Democratic governments gained international recognition while a military regime may not.

(xii) In democratic governments, there is the independence of the judiciary while under a military regime, the independence of the Judiciary is eroded by setting up special military tribunals.

(xiii) In democratic governments, there is a fixed term of office while in the military there is no fixed term of office.

(xiv) Democratic governments are responsive and accountable to the people while a military regime is neither responsive nor accountable to the people.

(i) Economic inequality among member states.

(ii) inability to enforce its resolutions/sanctions

(iii) Divided loyalty resulting from the membership of other international organizations.

(iv) Ideological differences of member states.

(v) The political instability of some member states.

(vi) Introduction of visas by Britain discouraged free movement of people and technology.

(vii) Inadequate funds for the execution of its projects

(viii) Free entry and exit of member states from the organization.