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JSS3: COMPUTER STUDIES - 1ST TERM

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  1. Computer Career Oppurtunities | Week 1
    5Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Computer Viruses I | Week 2
    7Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Computer Viruses II | Week 3
    7Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Introduction To The Internet | Week 4
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Internet Terminologies | Week 5
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. The Concept of Digital Divide | Week 6
    5Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Database Concept, Definition And Terminologies | Week 7
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Database II | Week 8
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Database III | Week 9
    13Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
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What is a Sector?

A sector is a subdivision of a drive. The term is derived from the mathematical term for a portion of a circle (an arc) that is enclosed by 3 radii, or lines, from the centre, to the edge of a circle. So in computer storage terms, a sector is an arc where data is written.

What is a Boot Sector?

A boot sector is a region of a hard disk, floppy disk, optical disc, or other data storage devices, that contain machine code to be loaded into Random Access Memory (RAM)

The purpose of a boot sector is to allow the boot process of a computer, to load a program, usually an operating system stored on the same storage device. The location and size of the boot sector, are specified by the design of the computing platform.

What and Where is a Boot Sector?

In order for a PC to be useable, it needs to power up and boot. The PC has two stages of booting up. The first stage boot loader is the BIOS. This is so that all the primary hardware would come online, and be able to communicate with one another. This also contains instructions on which hardware, usually a storage device, gets access to get to the second stage of the boot process. The second stage boot loader is used to load the OS.

A Boot sector virus is a virus that places its own codes, and commands, into a computer’s DOS boot sector, or Master Boot Record (MBR)

When a boot sector virus has infected a system, the MBR is usually corrupted, and a computer’s boot sequence is changed. Since the MBR is located on the first sector of a computer’s hard disk, the virus is called a boot sector virus.

Boot sector viruses can be dangerous because they are loaded onto a computer, every time one starts up. In time, they can spread to other readable disks. Booting problems and start-up problems, problems with retrieving data, computer performance instability, and the inability to locate hard drives, are all issues that may arise due to a boot sector virus infection.

Fortunately, Boot sector virus removal is easy. Using common antivirus software can remove the virus, quickly and efficiently. However, it is important to find antivirus software that is capable of removing the virus completely otherwise, it can result in a partial removal, which can then lead to a different part of a hard drive being affected.

Signs of Boot Sector Virus:

1. A boot sector virus can disable your service. For example, Microsoft Security Essential cannot scan for a virus.

2. It can also disable one of the services, and cause a blue screen every time you start up the computer.

3. It is interesting to note that a boot sector virus takes up exactly 2,048 bytes, making them easy to identify if you know where to look.

4. To look for how many bytes your computer should have, look at the properties of your computer and look at the system information.

5. Missing files is another sign that you may have contracted this virus.

6. If the difference between the numbers of the RAM check and your disk check is 2,048 bytes, you know that you are dealing with a boot sector virus, and you can treat the problem.

7. You may be a victim of a boot sector virus if you find, that your computer has difficulty starting up, or you find a lot of corrupt system files.

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