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JSS3: ENGLISH LANGUAGE - 1ST TERM

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  1. JSS3: English 1st Term (Revision) | Week 1
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  2. JSS3: English 1st Term | Week 2
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  3. JSS3: English 1st Term | Week 3
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  5. JSS3: English 1st Term | Week 5
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  6. JSS3: English 1st Term | Week 6
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  8. JSS3: English 1st Term | Week 8
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  9. JSS3: English 1st Term | Week 9
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  10. JSS3: English 1st Term | Week 10
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Topic Content:

  • Meaning of Clause
  • Types of Clauses
    • Main or independent Clause
    • Dependent or Subordinate Clause
      • Noun Clauses
      • Adjectival Clauses
      • Adverbial Clauses
      • Prepositional Clauses

What is a Clause?

A clause is a group of words containing a finite verb. The verb in it expresses the action, idea, or meaning. A clause itself expresses a complete idea or meaning.

We have two types of clauses:

1. Main or independent Clause.
2. Dependent or Subordinate Clause.

Main/Independent Clause:

The main Clause is the type of clause, or group of words, that can stand alone to express a complete idea. It contains a subject and verb and expresses a complete thought.

For example, in the sentence, “The angry dog growled ominously,” the word “dog” is the simple subject and the predicate is “growled” so the main clause of the sentence would be, “The dog growled.”

Another example: Kike read all week, but she was still unable to complete her presentation. Note that “Kike read all week” and “she was still unable to complete her presentation” are both independent clauses. They could potentially stand alone as sentences.

Subordinate Clause/Dependent Clause

A subordinate clause, like an independent clause, has a subject and a verb, but unlike an independent clause, it cannot stand alone to make a complete sentence, because it is not a complete thought.

e.g.

Independent ClauseSubordinate Clause
We bought the book

The football match was postponed
which he recommended 

because the field was too wet

In the example above, “which he recommended” and “because the field was too wet” are subordinate clauses because they require additional information in order to make sense.

Types of Subordinate Clauses:

Subordinate Clauses can be divided into four types:

1. Noun Clauses
2. Adjectival Clauses
3. Adverbial Clauses
4. Prepositional Clauses

1. Noun Clause:

A noun clause is a subordinate clause that performs the functions of a noun.

A. Noun Clause as Subject of a Verb:

  • The simple truth is bitter. (The simple truth is the subject of the verb “is”).
  • The story that you heard spread like harmattan fire. (The story that you heard is the subject of the verb “spread”)

B. Noun Clause as Subject Complement:

 

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