Back to Course

SS1: CHEMISTRY - 1ST TERM

0% Complete
0/0 Steps
  1. Introduction to Chemistry and Laboratory Apparatus | Week 1
    5Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Nature of Matter | Week 2
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Separation Techniques I | Week 3
    1Topic
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Separation Techniques II | Week 4
    5Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Particulate Nature of Matter I | Week 5
    5Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Particulate Nature of Matter II | Week 6
    9Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Symbols, Formulae & Oxidation Number | Week 7
    7Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Laws of Chemical Combination | Week 8
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Chemical Equation & Chemical Combination (Chemical Bonding) I | Week 9
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Chemical Combination (Chemical Bonding) II | Week 10
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  11. Chemical Combination (Chemical Bonding) III & Shapes of Covalent Molecules | Week 11
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
0% Complete

Immiscible liquids can be separated by decantation using a separating funnel. For example, water and kerosene. The use of a separating funnel is based on the difference in the polarities of the liquids. Water is a polar solvent, while most organic solvents are non-polar, hence, immiscible with water.

separating funnel

Procedure:

Put the two immiscible liquids in the separating funnel as shown in the diagram above. 

Allow the two mixtures to be separated into two layers. 

On opening the tap, the liquid which is denser (water) will run off from the funnel to the beaker while the less dense liquid (petrol) remains in the funnel. Examples of non-polar organic solvents that are immiscible with water are vegetable oil, paraffin, benzene, petrol, turpentine, tetrachloromethane, etc.

back-to-top
error: