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SS1: ENGLISH LANGUAGE - 1ST TERM

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  1. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 1
    5 Topics
  2. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 2
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    1 Quiz
  3. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 3
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    1 Quiz
  4. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 4
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  5. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 5
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    2 Quizzes
  6. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 6
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  7. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 7
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  8. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 8
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  9. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 9
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We have considered the nature of the informal letter and the various parts, namely:

i.     The Heading
ii.    The Salutation
iii.   The Body
iv.   The Complimentary Close
v.    Ending

       We will now consider an informal letter question and the model answers to the question.

Question: You have received information that your younger brother who is schooling in another part of the country, is playing truant and keeping bad company. Write a letter warning him of the consequences of such behaviour and urging him to turn over a new leaf. (WAEC, June, 1997)

                                                                             Federal Government College,

                                                                             P.M.B. 1050,

                                                                             Minna,

                                                                             Niger State.

                                                                             30th June, 1997.

Dear Ade,

       I was in the village last week to spend the mid-term break. Dad showed me a letter written by Mr. Abimbola, your form teacher. I was shocked by the content of the letter.

       According to Mr. Abimbola, you no longer attend classes; the last term you missed all continuous assessment tests. That explains why your result was very poor. You have joined a group of bad boys known as Red Devils. You people smoke marijuana, abuse drugs, drink alcohol, extort things from, and bully other students, and insult your teachers. The Students Disciplinary Committee of your school has threatened to expel you from the school if your conduct does not change for the better.

       I find it difficult to believe that Ade, my well-behaved younger brother, has suddenly become a scoundrel. Of course, I don’t doubt Mr. Abimbola’s report. We all know he is a man of integrity. So, what has happened to you? Do you appreciate the implications of what you are doing to yourself? Let me remind you of the implications of your conduct, since, it appears, you have taken leave of your senses.

       Playing truant and neglecting your studies may result in more dismal academic performance. You know what that means – your college will ask you to withdraw. What will you do after dropping out of school? Become a truck-pusher or a motor-park tout? What would happen to your childhood dream of becoming an airplane pilot? Besides, the college can expel you for belonging to a gang and for continuing to flout school rules. Imagine the shame you would bring on the family! Then think of the possibility of your graduating from bullying and extortion to armed robbery. Think of the day you would be caught, tried in court convicted, and executed for armed robbery!

       Ade, the family has been thrown into mourning since Dad received Mr. Abimbola’s letter. The news simply worsened Dad’s asthmatic condition. Mummy is heartbroken. It is unfair the way you are trying to reward our parents for all they have done for you. The only piece of news that will lift their spirits now is for them to hear that you have turned over a new leaf. I promised them you’d change after I’ve spoken to you. I’m sure you wouldn’t let me down. You don’t want anything to happen to your parents, do you?

       Aunty Bose had a set of twins last week. She and the kids are in excellent health. Brother Bolaji has fixed his traditional marriage for 24th December. Everybody at home sends greetings. I hope to read from you soonest. Remain blessed.

Your beloved sister,

Kemi

Class Activity:

Read the above letter once again and determine whether it conforms to the conventions of the informal letter.

Individual Activity:

Assuming you are Kemi, write a letter to your father, begging him to give Ade some time to change his conduct at school and suggest what your parents can do to help Ade.

References:

1. Oral English Without Tears by I. Udoka
2. New Oxford Secondary  English Course for SSI by Ayo Banjo et al
3. School Certificate English Language by I. Udoka


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