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SS1: ENGLISH LANGUAGE - 1ST TERM

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  1. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 1
    5 Topics
  2. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 2
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    1 Quiz
  3. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 3
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    1 Quiz
  4. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 4
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  5. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 5
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    2 Quizzes
  6. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 6
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  7. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 7
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  8. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 8
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    2 Quizzes
  9. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 9
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The Syllable:

A syllable is the minimum unit of English speech. For instance, when the word ‘Monday’ is pronounced, two distinct sounds (syllables), ‘MON’ and ‘DAY’, are heard. Similarly, when the word \cultivate’ is pronounced, three syllables stand out: CUL /TI/ VATE.

Syllabic Consonants:

A syllabic consonant is defined as a consonant that replaces the weak vowel /ə/ in a syllable on its own. The syllabic consonant constitutes a syllable on its own. Three consonants that are regarded as syllabic consonants in English are /l/, /m/ and /n/.

Consider the two-syllable words, certain /sз:tn/ and sudden /s˄dn/. The vowel sound represented by ‘ai’ and ‘e’ is the weak vowel /ə/. Therefore, the syllabic consonant /n/ replaces /ə/ in both words.

Other examples of words with syllabic consonants:

little, bottle, kettle, rattle, novel, simple, soften, ripen, hasten, chasten, button, rhythm.

Evaluation:

Practice pronouncing the above words with syllabic consonants without deleting the consonants or inserting intrusive vowel sounds. Use the words in sentences.

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