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SS1: ENGLISH LANGUAGE - 1ST TERM

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  1. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 1
    5 Topics
  2. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 2
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    1 Quiz
  3. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 3
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  4. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 4
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  5. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 5
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  6. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 6
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  7. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 7
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  8. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 8
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  9. SS1: English Language First Term - Week 9
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i. Irregular Verbs with three forms

These verbs do not change their present tense, past tense, and past participle forms.

Present Tense Continuous Tense Past TensePast Participle
hit, hits   hittinghit  hit  
burst bursting  burst    burst    
spreadspreadingspreadspread
split, splits splittingsplitsplit
thrust, thrusts  thrustingthrustthrust
cost, costs costingcostcost
bet, bets betting  bet  bet  
cut, cuts cutting    cutcut
shed, shedsshedding     shed shed 
set, sets   setting       setset
shut, shuts   shutting shutshut
hurt, hurtshurting hurthurt
put, puts putting putput

ii. Irregular Verbs with four forms

In these verbs, the present tense and the past participle are the same word. In other examples, the past tense and the past participle are the same word.

Present Tense Continuous Tense Past TensePast Participle
come, comes    comingcame come
run, runs    running ran    run
overrun, overrunsoverrunning   overran  overrun  
become, becomesbecomingbecame become 
say, sayssayingsaidsaid
pay, pays   payingpaidpaid
dream, dreams dreamingdreamtdreamt 
lay, layslayinglaidlaid

iii. Irregular Verbs with five forms

In these verbs, the past tense form often differs from the past participle.

Present Tense Continuous Tense Past TensePast Participle
eat, eats    eatingateeaten
know, knows   knowing knew    known
see, seesseeingsaw seen
bite, bites     biting   bitbitten
shake, shakesshakingshookshaken
slay, slays  slayingslewslain
lie, lies         lying laydreamt 
lay, layslayinglaidlain
write, writeswritingwrotewritten
break, breaksbreakingbrokebroken
drive, drivesdrivingdrovedriven

iv. The Verb ‘Be’

This verb is unique. It has eight forms.

Verb  Present TenseContinuousPast TensePast Participle
be am, is, arebeing  was, werebeen

v. Using Irregular Verbs in Sentences

Consider carefully the following sentences:

  1. They eat noodles everyday
  2. They ate noodles yesterday
  3. They have eaten noodles this morning
  4. Mr. Johnson is a teacher
  5. The woman is being treated for cancer
  6. The man has been to various countries of the world

The sentences above show that, while we can use the present and past tense forms of verbs as single words, (a, b, d), the continuous and past participle forms must be supported by auxiliary verbs (c, e, f).

References:

1. Oral English Without Tears by I. Udoka
2. New Oxford Secondary  English Course for SSI by Ayo Banjo et al
3. Intensive English for SSS I by B. O. Oluikpe et al

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