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SS1: GOVERNMENT - 2ND TERM

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  1. Types of Government Continues, Federal and Confederal Systems of Government | Week 1
    6 Topics
    |
    2 Quizzes
  2. Forms of Government: Presidential System of Government | Week 2
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Forms of Government: Parliamentary System of Government | Week 3
    6 Topics
    |
    2 Quizzes
  4. Structure and Organization of Government: Legislature | Week 4
    5 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Structure and Organization of Government: Executive Content | Week 5
    5 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Structure and Organization of Government: Judiciary Content | Week 6
    5 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Basic Principles of Government: Political Participation and Political Apathy | Week 7
    5 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Basic Principles of Government: Rule of Law and Delegated Legislation | Week 8
    8 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Basic Principles of Government: Centralization and Decentralization | Week 9
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz



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Merits of Parliamentary System of Government:

(i) It promotes harmony and cooperation between the executive and the legislature.

(ii) It promotes accountability and responsibility of the government to the people through some inherent checks principles therein e.g. official opposition recognition, and collective responsibility.

(iii) It is less expensive.

(iv) Decisions are quickly made since there is fusion of power.

(v) It eliminates constant disagreement and conflict between two arms of government. This promotes political stability.

(vi) It enhances party discipline and loyalty as members of the party in the parliamentary voting on issues must adhere strictly to the party line.

(vii) The government is kept under control by the opposition party.

(viii) It also prevents the emergence of a dictator because of a vote of no confidence that can be passed on the cabinet.

Demerits of Parliamentary System of Government:

(i) Best qualified candidates may not be appointed as ministers as ministers are appointed from only the ruling party in the parliament. This can affect the efficiency of the legislature.

(ii) It is not very democratic as the Head of Government (Prime Minister) is not elected by the people but rather is appointed by the majority party in the parliament.

(iii) The Prime Minister is not directly responsible to the people rather he is responsible to the legislature that appointed him.

(iv) It is difficult to blame any minister who has failed to deliver due to the principle of collective responsibility.

(v) The life of the cabinet is not secure since the legislature can dismiss the entire cabinet with a vote of no confidence.

(vi) The Prime Minister may become a dictator due to the enormous power vested in him.

(vii) There may be friction and unhealthy rivalry between the Head of State and Head of Government.

(viii) The cabinet may not be committed, dedicated, focused, and accountable because of the existence of collective responsibility which cannot hold a minister individually responsible for lapses and inactions of the government.

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