Back to Course

SS1: PHYSICS – 1ST TERM

0% Complete
0/0 Steps
  1. Introduction to Physics | Week 1
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Measurement | Week 2
    3Topics
  3. Measurement of Mass | Week 3
    6Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Motion | Week 4
    5Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Velocity-Time Graph | Week 5
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Causes of Motion | Week 6
    5Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Work, Energy & Power | Week 7
    3Topics
  8. Energy Transformation / Power | Week 8
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Heat Energy | Week 9
    5Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Linear Expansion | Week 10
    6Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
Lesson 9, Topic 4
In Progress

Kinetic Molecular Theory II

Lesson Progress
0% Complete

The kinetic molecular theory assumes that

1. Every substance is made up of tiny particles called molecules.

2. The molecules are in constant random motion, colliding elastically with one another and changing their direction.

3. There is always an attractive force between the molecules.

4. The volume of the gas molecules is negligible compared to the volume of the gas container.

Translational_motion

Kinetic Theory: Explanation of Temperature:

Molecules of a substance are in constant motion, hence they possess kinetic energy. When heat is added to a substance, it causes an increase in the speed of motion of the molecules of the substance and this leads to an increase in kinetic energy of the molecules of the substance and an increase in temperature of the substance.

Using the Kinetic Molecular Theory to Explain Expansion:

When heat is added to a substance, molecules in the substance experience an increase in kinetic energy, vibrate strongly, and break away from the intermolecular force of attraction that holds the molecules together and move further apart. This movement of the molecules causes the object to expand.

Using the Kinetic Molecular Theory to Explain Melting:

When heat is added to a substance, molecules in the substance experience an increase in kinetic energy, vibrate strongly, and break away from the intermolecular force of attraction that holds the molecules together and move further apart. This movement then causes the substance to melt or change from solid-state to liquid state.

Using the Kinetic Molecular Theory to Explain Evaporation:

When heat is added to a substance, molecules in the substance experience an increase in kinetic energy, vibrate strongly, and break away from the intermolecular force of attraction that holds the molecules together and move further apart. This movement then causes the substance to change to vapour.

back-to-top
error: