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SS2: CHEMISTRY - 2ND TERM

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  1. Water & Solution I | Week 1
    10 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Water, Solution and Solubility | Week 2 & 3
    9 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Air | Week 4
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Pollution | Week 5
    6 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Rate of Chemical Reaction | Week 6 & 7
    6 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Energy and Energy Effect I | Week 8 & 9
    7 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Energy and Energy Effect II | Week 10 & 11
    6 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Chemical Equilibrium | Week 12
    8 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz



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Topic Content:

  • Meaning of Air Pollution
  • Causes of Air Pollution
  • Effects of Air Pollution
  • Control of Air Pollution

Air pollution is the addition of substances like dust, smoke, and soot sulphur(IV) oxide into the air which alters the composition of the atmosphere causing harm to both plants and animals.

Causes of Air Pollution:

The main cause of air pollution is the combustion of fuels such as coal, petrol, gasoline, and gases.

Combustion is a chemical reaction between substances, usually including oxygen and usually accompanied by the generation of heat and light in the form of flame.

1. Particulate Matter [Tiny Solids]: These are solid pollutants emitted by industrial processes, burning of coal, and wood fires. They include smoke, soot, and dust. Lead is another poisonous solid pollutant emitted in the exhaust of motor cars using leaded petrol. Lead dust causes lead poisoning and injury to the nervous system.

2. Oxides of Carbon: An oxocarbon or oxide of carbon is a chemical compound consisting only of carbon and oxygen. The simplest and most common oxocarbons are carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2).

(a) Carbon(II) oxide, also known as carbon monoxide, is produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon in fuel. Carbon(II) oxide when inhaled competes with oxygen for the haemoglobin in the blood. A low concentration of Carbon(II) oxide causes dizziness, headache, fatigue, and lethargy.

 

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