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SS2: ENGLISH - 1ST TERM

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  1. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 1
    4 Topics
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    2 Quizzes
  2. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 2
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    2 Quizzes
  3. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 3
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    1 Quiz
  4. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 4
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    2 Quizzes
  5. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 5
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    2 Quizzes
  6. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 6
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  7. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 7
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    2 Quizzes
  8. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 8
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    1 Quiz
  9. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 9
    5 Topics
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    3 Quizzes



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Read the following essay carefully.

When Cholesterol is Harmful By Yemi Kolapo

     The term cholesterol is perhaps the most widely misunderstood word in nutrition. Most people run away from anything considered rich in cholesterol, as if going near it would spell doom. But would you believe that the surest way of checking your blood cholesterol level is not to avoid foods that are high in cholesterol?

Instead of running away from only foods that are high in cholesterol, it is better to avoid those that contain saturated fat. The reason for this is not far-fetched. Although dietary cholesterol can actually influence the make-up of your serum cholesterol, saturated fat is a far stronger influence in the daily diet of most people. Unlike fat which is consumed in large quantities in diets, cholesterol is only consumed in tiny quantities. In a normal healthy diet, it is possible to consume about a pound of fat a week, and usually, one-third of this fat is saturated.

There is no gain-saying the fact that eggs have a high dose of cholesterol, the recommended daily limit being about 213mg for a large 300mg. But in the real sense of it, compared with most cuts of meat, they are relatively low in saturated fat. The nutritional value is however impressive because they are an excellent source of essential nutrients like calcium, iron, vitamins D, A and B, as well as protein.

People run away from eggs because of the cholesterol content but remember that dietary cholesterol has only a modest effect on blood cholesterol levels. This is one of the reasons fat is measured in grams while cholesterol is measured in milligrams (a thousandth of a gram.)

There are so many bottled and canned foods out there that are more dangerous to health than the high-cholesterol food we all have our eyes on. For instance, foods that are labelled with the words ‘hydrogenated vegetable oil” or “hydrogenated fat” could be particularly dangerous to health because they usually contain trans-fat. Trans-fat, which is commonly found in commercially baked foods and in margarine, as well as in the oil used by most restaurants, raises to a high extent, the cholesterol levels in the body.

For a healthy diet, however, saturated fat, not cholesterol, is supposed to be the most important item to avoid because saturated fat has a more powerful and straightforward effect on serum cholesterol. In this regard, if you must eat liver, which is high in cholesterol, it is good to weigh the other elements of your diet so as to balance it out over time. Nutritionists say that whether you choose to eat steak or liver, fatty foods must be avoided for that day. Even the tiniest salad dressing should be avoided.

Once you have taken so much liver in a meal, you could stick to only vegetables in the next one or two meals. But remember that if you love liver, you do not have to give it up. Moderation should be your watchword. Try to eat small portions and substitute with vegetables in subsequent meals.

(Source: School Certificate English Language pages 56-58)

Class Activity:

Read through the essay once again and criticize it in terms of its adherence to the conventions of expository writing.

Individual Activity:

Write an essay on How food is cultivated in your community. You may use the following guidelines;

  • Define food cultivation and enumerate different methods of food cultivation in your community.
  • Discuss each of the methods you have enumerated.
  • Conclude by summarizing the methods discussed in the light of present-day developments in food cultivation.

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