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SS2: ENGLISH - 3RD TERM

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  1. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 1
    4 Topics
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    2 Quizzes
  2. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 2
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    1 Quiz
  3. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 3
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    2 Quizzes
  4. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 4
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    3 Quizzes
  5. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 5
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    2 Quizzes
  6. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 6
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  7. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 7
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  8. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 8
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    2 Quizzes
  9. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 9
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In SS one, you studied the structure of the complex sentence. We will now revise that lesson.

Definitions

A complex sentence contains one main clause and at least one subordinate clause.

Clauses

A clause is a combination of related words containing a subject and a verb. It can be a simple sentence or a part of a compound sentence

Examples:

  • She laughed. (one clause)
  • I waited for him but he didn’t come. (two clauses)

Clauses have two major types, namely:

  • Main (independent) clause
  • Subordinate (dependent) clause

Read the following sentences:

  • I saw a man who was crying.

The above sentence has two clauses:

‘I saw a man’ and ‘who was crying,’ The first clause ‘I saw a man’ gives a complete meaning and can stand alone as a complete sentence. Such a phrase is called Main or Independent clause.

On the other hand, the second clause ‘who was crying’ does not give a complete meaning and cannot (as alone) stand as a complete sentence. It depends on the main clause to give a complete meaning. Such a clause is called Subordinate or Dependent clause.

 Main or Independent clause is that clause which expresses a complete meaning. It alone can stand as a sentence.

Examples:

  • The professor asked many questions although no one could answer.
  • I met a friend who helped me a lot
  • They contacted the customer who had not paid the bill.
  • He does not like the people who smoke.
  • We met a man who could speak many languages.

Subordinate or Dependent clause is that clause which (as alone) cannot express a complete meaning. It alone cannot stand as a sentence, because it depends on the main clause to give a complete meaning. It serves a subordinate role in the sentence.

Examples:

  • The professor asked many questions although no one could answer.
  • I met a friend who helped me a lot
  • They contacted the customer who had not paid the bill.
  • He does not like the people who smoke.
  • We met a man who could speak many languages.

A subordinate clause may begin with any of the following words called subordinators – when, because, if, before, whatever, unless, that, which, who, whoever, whom, whomever, whose, after, although, as, as if, as though, in order that, since, so that, though, until, whenever, where, wherever, while.

References

1.  Oral English Without Tears by I. Udoka

2.  New Oxford Secondary English Course for SS 2 by Ayo Banjo et al

3.  Intensive English for SS 2 by Benson O. Oluikpe et al

4.  School Certificate English Language by I. Udoka

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