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SS2: GOVERNMENT - 1ST TERM

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  1. Electoral Process | Week 1
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Types of Electoral Process | Week 2
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Electoral Process Continues - Proportional, Representation, Repeated Ballot, Direct and Indirect Elections | Week 3
    5 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Ballot Systems/Types of Voting | Week 4
    3 Topics
  5. Organization of Election | Week 5
    4 Topics
  6. Electoral Commission and Electoral Officers | Week 6
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Public Opinion and Mass Media | Week 7
    6 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Civil Service | Week 8
    6 Topics
  9. Personnel Administration in the Civil Service | Week 9
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Public Corporation | Week 10
    9 Topics
  11. Commercialization, Privatization and Deregulation of Public Corporations | Week 11
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz



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Absolute majority system is the electoral system in which the winner must score more than half of the total votes cast (50% + 1) in an election. This system is easy to operate in a two-party system where there are only two contestants. But in a multi-party system where there are more than two contestants, it may be difficult for a winner to emerge at the first round of voting. It may always result in second balloting. For example at the end of voting, election results may be thus:

Kennedy11,000 votes
Whearse26,000 votes
John4,500 votes
Anthony8,500 votes

In the above distribution of votes, at the end of the election, Whearse will be declared the winner having scored (50% + 1) more than half of the total vote cast in the election. This system operates in Australia.

Merits of Absolute Majority System

(i) A winner that emerges is clear to everyone

(ii) It leaves nobody in doubt of who wins the election

(iii) The winners enjoy support of the majority

(iv) This system is fair to all political parties and candidates that contested for the election.

(v) The number of seats enjoyed by each political party in the parliament is a reflection of the support it enjoys from the people.

(vi) It promotes political stability as the political parties and candidates are convinced that the winner won the election.

(vii) This promotes active political participation as both the party and candidates work very hard to get the support of the people.

Demerits of Absolute Majority System

(i) Elections may result in deadlocks. A clear-cut winner may not emerge at the end of the election. This may result in another round of election or run-off election (second ballot).

(ii) It is expensive. It costs time and funds especially when the voting is repeated.

(iii) It is complicated. It involves a lot of calculation and protocol.

(iv) Election results may be delayed if a winner does not emerge after the first round of voting.

(v) It may result in political apathy as the voters whose candidates were dropped after the first ballot may fail to participate in the second balloting (run-off election)

(vi) It weakens small political parties.

(viii) This system does not work well in illiterate poor countries where votes may not be rational.

(ix) It encourages election malpractices, political tension and violence as political parties try to win by all means.

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