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SS2: ENGLISH - 2ND TERM

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  1. SS2: English Language Second Term – Week 1
    4 Topics
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    2 Quizzes
  2. SS2: English Language Second Term – Week 2
    4 Topics
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    2 Quizzes
  3. SS2: English Language Second Term – Week 3
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    2 Quizzes
  4. SS2: English Language Second Term – Week 4
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    2 Quizzes
  5. SS2: English Language Second Term – Week 5
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    2 Quizzes
  6. SS2: English Language Second Term – Week 6
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    1 Quiz
  7. SS2: English Language Second Term – Week 7
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    2 Quizzes
  8. SS2: English Language Second Term – Week 8
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    2 Quizzes
  9. SS2: English Language Second Term – Week 9
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Phrasal verbs may convey either obvious or obscure meaning.  When the meaning is obscure, a phrasal verb becomes an idiomatic expression.  On the other hand, if the meaning is obvious, it becomes non-idiomatic.

Examples:

1.     They waited for him to come down. (literal)

        They were sitting down. (literal)

2.     The convict broke down (= lost control of his feelings) when the judge pronounced the sentence (idiomatic)

        Did you catch on? (= understand)  –  idiomatic

3.     He has vowed to keep out of trouble. (literal)

        Many candidates went in for the examination.  (literal)

4.     I will not be surprised if he goes back on (= breaks) his promise. (idiomatic)

 She puts up with (= tolerates) a lot of embarrassment from her friend. (idiomatic)

The same meaning may be expressed by more than one phrasal verb, as in :

After completing his prison term, he kept out of/kept away

from/stayed away from/stayed out of trouble.

The same phrasal verb may have different meanings, as follows:

During the Christmas party, I fell in with (= met by chance) an old

friend of mine.

I am ready to fall in with (= agree to) anything you propose.

A change of one of the particles may signal a change in the meaning of the phrasal verb, as in:

I am always ready to stand up for (= support) a good cause.

If you stand up to (= oppose) the man, he may not carry out his plan

REFERENCES

  1. Oral English Without Tears by I. Udoka.
  2. New Oxford Secondary English Course for SSS2 by Ayo Banjo et al
  3. Intensive English for SSS2 by B.O. Oluikpe et al.

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