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SS2: ENGLISH - 3RD TERM

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  1. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 1
    4 Topics
    |
    2 Quizzes
  2. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 2
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  3. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 3
    4 Topics
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    2 Quizzes
  4. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 4
    4 Topics
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    3 Quizzes
  5. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 5
    4 Topics
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    2 Quizzes
  6. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 6
    4 Topics
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    2 Quizzes
  7. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 7
    4 Topics
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    2 Quizzes
  8. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 8
    4 Topics
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    2 Quizzes
  9. SS2: English Language 3rd Term – Week 9
    4 Topics
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    2 Quizzes



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In SS One you learnt a number of spelling rules. In this lesson and the next, we will revise the rules and introduce you to some other words that are commonly misspelt.

1.    Dropping ‘e’

       A word ending in silent ‘e’ generally drops the ‘e’ before a suffix beginning with a vowel sound.

       desire + -ous            =       desirous

       combine + -ation     =       combination

       dine + -ing               =       dining

       come + -ing             =       coming

2.    Retaining ‘e’

       A word ending in silent ‘e’ generally retains the ‘e’ before a suffix beginning with a consonant or with any of the vowels a, i, o.

       peace + -ble             =       peaceable

       singe + -ing             =       singeing

       dye + -ing                =       dyeing

       notice + -able           =       noticeable

       courage + -ous         =       courageous

       arrange + -ment       =       arrangement

3.    ‘i’ before ‘e’

       Use ‘i’ before ‘e’ in spelling a word with the long ‘ee’ sound.

       relieve, believe, chief, grief, wield, yield, niece, field, thief, brief, shriek, siege, mischief.

       Exception: seize

4.    ‘e’ before ‘i’

       Use ‘e’ before ‘i’ in spelling a word with the long ‘ee’ sound follows ‘c’.

       Ceiling, receive, deceive, perceive, conceive, conceit

5.    Doubling Consonant

       Words of one syllable and words of more than one syllable with the stress on the last syllable double the final consonant before a suffix beginning with a vowel.

       drop + -ing, -ed        =       dropping, dropped

       slim + -ing, -ed        =       slimming, slimmed

       ban + -ing, -ed         =       banning, banned

       admit + -ing, -ed      =       admitting, admitted

       occur + -ing, -ed      =       occurring, occurred

       begin + -ing             =       beginning

       refer + -ing, -ed        =       referring, referred

       travel + -ing, -ed      =       travelling, travelled

6.    Distinguish Verb from Noun

VerbNoun
adviseadvice
devisedevice
licenselicence
prophesyprophecy
practisepractice

(In American English, practice is used as both verb and noun)

7.    Pronunciation Helps

       Slovenly pronunciation is often the cause of misspelling. The presence of the letter e in hope makes it differ in meaning and pronunciation from the word hop. Even when the two words take the suffix –ing, they would still be spelt differently.

       hope (hoping)                   hop (hopping)

       bare (baring)                     bar (barring)

       mate (mating)                   mat (matting)

       mope (moping)                 mat (matting)

       rate (rating)                       rat (ratting)

       site (siting)                        sit (sitting)

       tape (taping)                     tap (tapping)

       dine (dining)                     din (dinning)

8.    ‘-tain’ verbs and their nouns

VerbNoun
retainretention
maintainmaintenance
sustainsustenance
detaindetention

9.    Plurals of compound words

       Form plurals of compound words such as father-in-law by adding s to the chief word, not the modifier.

       fathers-in-law                   brothers-in-law

       maids-of-honour               attorneys-general

       commanders-in-chief        secretaries-general

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