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JSS2: COMPUTER STUDIES - 1ST TERM

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  1. Computer Software | Week 1
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Operating System | Week 2
    9Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Computer Memory: Primary And Secondary Memory | Week 3
    5Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Computer Memory II: Secondary / Auxiliary / External Memory | Week 4
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Number System I | Week 5
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Number System II | Week 6
    2Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Units of Storage In Computer | Week 7
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Problem Solving Skills With Computer | Week 8
    7Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Computer Programming Languages | Week 9
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
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The RAM is that part of the main memory, which holds the programs and instructions we type into the computer for processing. It is also called Read and Write memory. This means that we can access the information in it, and also be able to change them. RAM is bigger than ROM in size.

Problem of RAM:

One problem with the RAM is that information and program usually held in the computer disappears when you switch off your computer, or when there is a power failure.

Forms of RAM:

1. DRAM: Dynamic Random Access Memory has memory cells, with a paired transistor and capacitor requiring constant refreshing.

2. SRAM: Static Random Access Memory uses multiple transistors, typically four to six, for each memory cell, but does not have a capacitor in each cell. It is used primarily for the cache.

3. SDRAM: Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory takes advantage of the burst mode concept, to greatly improve performance. It does this by staying on the row containing the requested bit, and moving rapidly through the columns, reading each bit as it goes. The idea is that most of the time, the data needed by the CPU will be in sequence. SDRAM is fast and is the most common form of RAM in desktops today. The maximum transfer rate to the L2 cache is approximately 528 MBps.

4. DD SDRAM: Double Data Rate Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory is a type of random-access memory module, that allows for higher transfer rates and faster performance, compared to earlier RAM modules.

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