Back to Course

SS1: GOVERNMENT - 2ND TERM

0% Complete
0/0 Steps
  1. Types of Government Continues, Federal and Confederal Systems of Government | Week 1
    6 Topics
    |
    2 Quizzes
  2. Forms of Government: Presidential System of Government | Week 2
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Forms of Government: Parliamentary System of Government | Week 3
    6 Topics
    |
    2 Quizzes
  4. Structure and Organization of Government: Legislature | Week 4
    5 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Structure and Organization of Government: Executive Content | Week 5
    5 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Structure and Organization of Government: Judiciary Content | Week 6
    5 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Basic Principles of Government: Political Participation and Political Apathy | Week 7
    5 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Basic Principles of Government: Rule of Law and Delegated Legislation | Week 8
    8 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Basic Principles of Government: Centralization and Decentralization | Week 9
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz



  • Follow us

Lesson Progress
0% Complete

Supremacy to the parliament can be described as the exclusive right of the parliament to make and unmake laws without external control. The parliament has ultimate power in constitutional issues with the constitution.

This type exists mainly in a parliamentary system of government.

Limitations to Supremacy of the Legislative:

(i) The constitution limits the role of the parliament, referendum, and amendment procedure.

(ii) Judicial review: The Supreme court can review acts of the legislature (Once a bill has been enacted into law, it is called an act of the legislature) and declare them null and void if they contravene the provisions of the constitution.

(iii) International constraints.

(iv) Laws made by international organizations, of which the country is a member, can also limit parliamentary supremacy.

(v) Activities of interest groups/pressure groups are also a limitation.

(vi) Public opinion and the influence of the mass media is also a limitation.

(vii) The resources available in the country e.g. if the country is dependent on the countries, economically, militarily, technologically, etc.

(viii) Complexity of modern government has made it imperative for powers to be delegated to subordinate limits of government.

(ix) Executive can limit the parliament by dissolving the parliament through a vote of no confidence or veto power in a presidential system.

(x) House rules/standing orders of the House can also limit the supremacy of the legislature.

(ix) The mace limits the activities of the legislation as decisions made if the mace is absent cannot stand.

(x) Time or period also limits the supremacy of the legislature.

Responses

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

error: