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SS2: ENGLISH - 1ST TERM

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  1. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 1
    4 Topics
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    2 Quizzes
  2. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 2
    4 Topics
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    2 Quizzes
  3. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 3
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 4
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    2 Quizzes
  5. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 5
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    2 Quizzes
  6. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 6
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    1 Quiz
  7. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 7
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    2 Quizzes
  8. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 8
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  9. SS2: English Language First Term – Week 9
    5 Topics
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    3 Quizzes



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A consonant cluster occurs when two or more consonant sounds occur together in a word.

The spelling of the word may not always be a good guide in determining where consonant clusters occur in a word. Take, for instance, the word rhythm. Looking at its spelling, the word has six consonant letters occurring together. However, when the word is pronounced /rɪðəm/, it contains no clusters at all.

On the other hand, the word axed has no cluster of consonant letters in its spelling. But when the word is pronounced /ækst/, we notice that there is a cluster of three consonants /kst/.

Clusters can be of two, three, or more consonants. They can occur in the initial, medial, or final position in a word.

Note the following examples.

Initial Medial Final
plait /pleIt/     restore /restɔ:/task /tæsk/
sprain /spreIn/  restrain /restreIn/ asked /æskt/

Many students face the challenge of pronouncing consonant clusters correctly without inserting a vowel sound between the clusters. Consider the following examples:

star /sta:r)/ not /sɪta:(r)/

strong /strɒŋ/ not /sɪtrɒŋ/

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