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JSS3: BASIC SCIENCE - 1ST TERM

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  1. Family Traits | Week 1
    6Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Environmental Hazards I - Soil Erosion | Week 2
    3Topics
  3. Environmental Hazards I - Flooding | Week 3
    5Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Environmental Hazards II - Bush Burning | Week 4
    4Topics
  5. Environmental Hazards II - Deforestation | Week 5
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Environmental Hazards III - Desertification | Week 6
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Environmental Hazards III - Description of the Ozone Layer and its Location in the Atmosphere | Week 7
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Drug and Substance Abuse | Week 8
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Resources from Living Things | Week 9
    4Topics
  10. Resources from Non-Living Things | Week 10
    2Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
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Soil erosion can be prevented using the following methods;

1. Mulching: This involves covering the ground with dried grasses. Dried grasses, spread over the surface of the soil, reduce the impact of raindrops striking the soil and cover it from the wind.

Mulching
Mulching.

2. Planting of Cover Crops: Planting of cover crops like mucuna bracteata, buckwheat, rye, wheat, corn, barley, oats, etc, prevent water and wind from carrying soil particles away.

Cover crop of Mucuna bracteata prevents soil erosion
Planting Cover crop “Mucuna bracteata” prevents soil erosion.

3. Crop Rotation: On sloping lands, crop rotations can help reduce soil erosion. Plants, like corn and grain crops, remove nitrogen and nutrients from the soil. Rotation of these plants, with alfalfa and other legumes, will enable the land to restore the soil nutrients, lost through absorption by the plants.

Crop rotation allows the land to regenerate and rejuvenate its self-nutrients, without having to apply more nutrients through the use of fertilizers.

Crop-rotation

4. Contouring of loping ground: This involves making ridges across the slope to prevent the downhill flow of water.

Contouring
Contouring.

5. Strip Cropping: Involves planting crops, that provide vegetation cover for the soil, in alternate strips across a slope.

Strip Cropping
Strip Cropping.

6. Planting of Shelter Belts: A shelterbelt, or windbreaker, is a planting usually made up of one or more rows of trees or shrubs, planted in such a manner as to provide shelter from the wind, and to protect soil from erosion.

shelter belts
Shelterbelt involves planting trees on flat areas to act as windbreakers.

How to Control Soil Erosion:

1. Afforestation: This involves the planting of trees in exposed land to prevent wind and soil erosion. 

2. Avoid bush burning and overgrazing.

3. Construction of water channels such as ditches, drainage, or dams across, gullies.

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